Sunday, March 23, 2014

Crooked and not-so-crooked Selfies

Though this is not my final version - I have toned down the arm and the background a bit, this is my "Crooked Selfie"... I have been in a wonderful color theory class with Kris Engman, an adjunct prof at UMO, and have been learning an enormous amount from her. I've had to take in so much that I could not internalize it all, but am only now beginning to appreciate what it is that she has been trying to drum into my head.


And this is my not-so-crooked selfie in a shadow...though I am not sure this is also the final version...These are what they are and I hope to do more of these kind of character sketches - as there are so many wonderful characters in my life! You'll be seeing these on  Facebook and ArtCollector Maine, as soon as I can get to putting them up.


Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Logo project done!

Voila the logo for the Congregational Church of Boothbay Harbor's capital campaign. The theme was decided before this design came to me, and is "Living Stones" - from a verse in 1Peter 2:5: "Like living stones, let yourselves be built into a spiritual house." Not a simple concept to visualize!

The first idea I had was to make little stones into stick figures. But that turned into M&M's, and I did not think they would raise lots of money to renovate a church. So I finally cut off the addition to the church and set it on a pyramid of stones, that were not square but squiggly like they were alive. Then because we are a harbor, I decided that it should be rising out of water, and be like a lighthouse. It is a popular image.

I have enjoyed making the communications materials based on this logo and the theme, Living Stones. But it has been as enormous amount of work, more than I anticipated. Still, very gratifying...so if you need a logo for a difficult theme or idea, just be in touch: salgsmith@gmail.com.

Friday, February 14, 2014

A Valentine for those in Need

In a banana's arms...

Who can fail to ripen beautifully!

Happy Valentine's Day, February 2014

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Frigidity!

'winterlight'

It's been the coldest, snowiest winter of my tenure here in East Boothbay, and I have been dealing with broken furnaces and frozen pipes and insurance adjusters ad nauseam. At the moment, all systems are functioning though neither the furnace in the barn nor the one in my house are in optimum condition. They are at least keeping me warmish.

The instigation of this drama involved my travelling around the holidays, first to Tennessee to visit Sloane and her parents, then to Vermont for Christmas, and Cambridge for New Year's. While in Cambridge with two young Finnish couples, the children of my old friends in Helsinki, a huge storm came in with bitter cold to follow and I was stuck there for two days. Apparently, at some point, the power went out and my house furnace refused to come back on. When Duane Pinkham arrived that Saturday morning, the house was down to 32 degrees, the pipes to the upstairs bath were burst; ice was coming out of the kitchen faucet. He reset the furnace and it came on, but was not reliable after that. There was never any guarantee that it would come back on when it was needed. After 4 different visits by men from Dead River, who all told me one way or another that I needed a new furnace, one of them put on a new igniter and the furnace has been humming along ever since - although the initial problem of the burnt out baffles remains to be fixed, or a new furnace installed.

Then, I approached the barn  fully expecting to walk into a cozy studio. It was not, and when I went to try the water, the faucet handle just popped right off in my hand! The water in the WC was frozen, and the radiant floor was not circulating.That issue remains, but there is water  for the sink and the john, and whatever is happening in the floor, at least it is now keeping the studio warm.

So I have been busy learning more about furnaces than I ever wanted to, but also learning what good help is around here. John Jicka has been a huge help, making things work again, and then replacing busted faucets and light fixtures. Steve Monroe has been huge in opening up walls so John can fix things, and then closing them up again - as if nothing had happened. Now we'll see how long it takes for the insurance money to come through!

The toll in the house: 4 poinsettias gone, 1 cactus, 1/2 Christmas cactus, a peace lily, and part of a kaffir lily, and one orchid. The rosemary and the cyclamen seem to have made it through. It was kind of a shock to check the water in the base of the peace lily and discover it was frozen! But like all green things, there will be more where these once were...and I shall turn my attention from travel this year to the house, sort out the issues that need to be addressed and those that don't, and get on with life. In the meantime, I have a logo for the church to develop, and paintings to produce. Here's an old, but hopeful one:

Sorry about the quality, but I'm still having issues with more than one image per blog...

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

and more...

I am still having issues with this blog...but I want to get more of these images up, so I will continue this way. Perhaps those who run Blogspot will notice, though probably not, and fix things...so on we go:


This was an early work when I was still in undisciplined mode...it's called 'off to market', and I love the light moving around and reflecting off unseen walls. Dawn in Vaison la Romaine was amazingly beautiful, with the sun coming up over the mountains in the east, and people walking down through the hill town to the markets in the valley. I was still searching for the periwinkle blue in the shutters, which I didn't find until I got home and could use white again!

This process is too tiresome...I shall wait until tomorrow to do more...


more workshop works...

Les Buies des Barronnies

Les Buies is a village near Vaison la Romaine, named for its 'buies', or arches built under the town houses you see above. The houses are incredibly colorful,and even in October, after the grape harvest, there were still people in some of the homes. It rained while we were there, and so many of us painted under the arches, but I fell in love with the roof lines and colors.

I will try another image?!?

Nope...

Workshop works...

The luxury of a painting workshop is that all things are taken care of except what you put on your paper, or canvas. I have never allowed myself the luxury of a workshop until my neighbor, Tony van Hasselt - noted watercolorist, announced that he was leading one to Vaison la Romaine in Provence last October. And so I went, and had a wonderful time...here are some more works:
La Potterie, Brantes

This little pottery makes lovely china, which Tony and Jan have in their home in East Boothbay.

(Blogspot seems not to be allowing me to add more than one image per blog at the moment, so I will add more work in the next blog.)